Day 3… Deb’s Twelve Days of Wildlife… DID YOU KNOW facts…

Deer can make vertical leaps of over two and a half metres and horizontal leaps of nine metres – that is almost as long as a school bus. It can reach speeds of up to 58 kilometres per hour.

Like a cow, the white-tailed deer’s stomach has four compartments. This allows food to be processed more efficiently and means that the deer can feed on things that other mammals cannot process.

One unusual characteristic of the white-tailed deer is that the doe leaves her fawn unattended for hours at a time. The fawn has very little scent and its spotted coat provides natural camouflage, which keeps it safe from predators. The doe returns a few times a day to feed the fawn.

A new born fawn is the size of two chihuahuas. Unless you actually see a dead doe, leave the fawn alone. Fawns are rarely orphaned.

Be sure to contact an animal rehab centre promptly if yourself dealing with a young fawn, because they imprint quickly, and once imprinted, are problematic to release back to the wild. If you see any in need of care, call Procyon Wildlife @ 905-729-0033. Help is in Your Hands!

Day 4… Deb’s Twelve Days of Wildlife… DID YOU KNOW facts…

Day 4….Deb’s Twelve Days of Wildlife…..DID YOU KNOW facts…
Skunks are nocturnal, so they are most active at night. They do not hibernate, but they tend to be inactive during the coldest months in winter, when many gather in communal dens for warmth. Though they typically prefer to dine on insects and grubs, skunks are omnivores, consuming a vast diet of both plant and animal matter.

 

 

 

Skunks are opportunistic eaters, and their diets are flexible, often shifting with the seasons. Skunks will stamp their feet, raise their tails and hunch their backs when they feel threatened, and can accurately spray the foul smelling fluid up to ten feet.

 

 

To neutralize or deodorize the skunk spray out of clothing, hair, skin and anything washable, mix 4cps of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 1/4 cup Baking Soda, 1 tbsp liquid dish soap. If you see any in need of care, call Procyon Wildlife @ 905-729-0033. Help is in Your Hands!